harvard
my fitness pal
my positive outlooks
positive
positive psychology news
positive sharing
positively positive
positively psychological
web md
count
sauces
help
I'm confused... What am I doing here?

Choose which sources you wish to remain and you're all set. Use the buttons to turn sources on and off.

What do the different colours mean?

Depending on if any articles/links are visible on the page there are 4 modes to show the state of your chosen sources.

on / visible on page

off / visible on page

on / not visible on page

off / not visible on page

Test for Coronavirus Antibodies Approved by FDA  - web md

Test for Coronavirus Antibodies Approved by FDA

The test checks for protective antibodies in a finger prick of blood, revealing whether a patient has ever been exposed to the coronavirus and now may have some immunity, The New York Times reported.
web md - 2 days ago
COMMENTARY: NYU Med Student Joins COVID Fight:

COMMENTARY: NYU Med Student Joins COVID Fight: 'Time to Step Up'

New York med schools asked fourth-year students to graduate early and volunteer to help battle COVID. One student discusses how he weighed the potential life-or-death decision to join the front lines.
web md - 2 days ago
Coronavirus Hangs Around After Symptoms Subside  - web md

Coronavirus Hangs Around After Symptoms Subside

It took about five days from the time patients were infected until symptoms appeared, and about eight days before they disappeared. Patients were contagious for one to eight days, the researchers said in a news release from the American Thoracic Society.
web md - 2 days ago
WalMart Will Check All Workers

WalMart Will Check All Workers' Temperatures

Employees with a temperature of over 100 degrees Fahrenheit will be sent home for at least three days and may be advised to seek medical treatment. The workers will be paid for showing up for work, CBS News reported.
web md - 3 days ago
In Some Cases, COVID-19 May Harm the Brain  - web md

In Some Cases, COVID-19 May Harm the Brain

It's believed the brain can be damaged by viral infection whenever a patient's immune system overreacts to the virus. This immune system hyperactivity triggers a "cytokine storm" -- an overproduction of immune cells and their activating compounds, known as cytokines.
web md - 3 days ago
How does cardiovascular disease increase the risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19? - harvard

How does cardiovascular disease increase the risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19?

Initial investigation into COVID-19 focused on its respiratory effects, but a more recent report describes serious cardiovascular complications in people with pre-existing heart disease. How does this underlying condition increase risk for these people? The post How does cardiovascular disease increase the risk of severe illness and death from COVID-19? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 3 days ago
Top 10 Must-Dos in ICU in COVID-19 Include Prone Ventilation  - web md

Top 10 Must-Dos in ICU in COVID-19 Include Prone Ventilation

With new European Society of Intensive Care Medicine guidelines on caring for critically ill COVID-19 patients covering more than 50 recommendations, Medscape asked one author for his essential top 10.
web md - 3 days ago
Top 10 Tips for Diabetes Telehealth Prophetic in Face of COVID-19  - web md

Top 10 Tips for Diabetes Telehealth Prophetic in Face of COVID-19

A new article sets the stage for routine virtual diabetes visits, offering 10 top tips that will undoubtedly be of use for transforming care during the COVID-19 pandemic, and likely for long afterwards.
web md - 3 days ago
Abortion Access Shifting in Some States Amid COVID-19  - web md

Abortion Access Shifting in Some States Amid COVID-19

In addition to challenges the coronavirus pandemic already poses to women seeking healthcare, several states have included surgical abortions as restricted procedures in executive orders related to COVID-19.
web md - 3 days ago
Ranitidine (Zantac) recall expanded, many questions remain - harvard

Ranitidine (Zantac) recall expanded, many questions remain

The FDA has not yet released the results of its testing of the heartburn medication ranitidine. The testing method used by the online pharmacy that originally alerted the FDA may have affected their results. The post Ranitidine (Zantac) recall expanded, many questions remain appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 4 days ago
Taking Stock - positively positive

Taking Stock

My intention is to walk this part of my life’s journey with a tremendous amount of compassion for myself and others. To navigate with as much positivity as I can muster, to set the intention to come out the other side knowing myself more, connecting a bit more deeply with the world outside my door even if it is over Zoom, and realizing that when push comes to shove, we sure as hell do know how to come together when faced with a difficult time. The post Taking Stock appeared first on Positively Positive.
positively positive - 4 days ago
FDA Requests Zantac Be Pulled From the Market  - web md

FDA Requests Zantac Be Pulled From the Market

Six months after independent testing first raised the possibility that popular heartburn drug ranitidine (Zantac) might break down into the powerful carcinogen n-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), the FDA has asked for the removal of all ranitidine products from the market.
web md - 4 days ago
EPA Didn’t Tell Residents About Gas Risks: Report  - web md

EPA Didn’t Tell Residents About Gas Risks: Report

A new government report has rebuked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for failing to tell residents about the health risks they face by living near facilities that release cancer-causing ethylene oxide gas.
web md - 4 days ago
Mild COVID-19 Often Only Shows Gastro Symptoms  - web md

Mild COVID-19 Often Only Shows Gastro Symptoms

In the new study, the research team tracked data from 206 patients with mild COVID-19. Nearly one-quarter (48) had digestive symptoms only, 69 displayed both digestive and respiratory symptoms, and 89 had respiratory symptoms only.
web md - 4 days ago
COVID-19 Deaths in Italy a Lesson for the US  - web md

COVID-19 Deaths in Italy a Lesson for the US

Italy was slow to enact social distancing orders following the first reports of COVID-19 cases in the country, a factor that experts believe may have played a part in how quickly coronavirus cases overwhelmed the nation's hospitals.
web md - 4 days ago
COVID-19: More Hydroxychloroquine Data From France  - web md

COVID-19: More Hydroxychloroquine Data From France

Further promising data from the Marseille group on the impact of hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 patients have been posted, but one French expert warns that doubts remain over the quality of the results.
web md - 4 days ago
Coronavirus on Fabric: What You Should Know  - web md

Coronavirus on Fabric: What You Should Know

If you suspect you got too close for too long, or someone coughed on you, there’s no harm in changing your clothing and washing it right away, especially if there are hard surfaces like buttons and zippers where the virus might linger.
web md - 4 days ago
What To Know If Your Surgery Has Been Put on Hold  - web md

What To Know If Your Surgery Has Been Put on Hold

"During this unprecedented pandemic, it is important to remember that your surgeon and health care team have your care and safety in mind. This is a very fluid situation that is literally changing on an hourly basis. As a result, it is reasonable to expect cancellations or changes to your care plan," Cohen and David wrote.
web md - 4 days ago
AI Might Spot At-Risk COVID-19 Patients  - web md

AI Might Spot At-Risk COVID-19 Patients

Developed by U.S. and Chinese researchers, the artificial intelligence (AI) program has been tested at two hospitals in China with 53 patients who were diagnosed in January with COVID-19. The new tool is considered experimental and is now in testing.
web md - 5 days ago
COVID-19 Slows Drug Studies, Curbs Clinical Trials  - web md

COVID-19 Slows Drug Studies, Curbs Clinical Trials

Most studies not considered critical are being deferred. This won’t have much effect in the short term, but if this continues, it could delay patient care and the federal approval of drugs that treat a wide range of conditions.
web md - 5 days ago
LOAD MORE HEALTH
harvard
my fitness pal
my positive outlooks
positive
positive psychology news
positive sharing
positively positive
positively psychological
web md
count
sauces
help
I'm confused... What am I doing here?

Choose which sources you wish to remain and you're all set. Use the buttons to turn sources on and off.

What do the different colours mean?

Depending on if any articles/links are visible on the page there are 4 modes to show the state of your chosen sources.

on / visible on page

off / visible on page

on / not visible on page

off / not visible on page

harvard
Harvard Health Ad Watch: When marketing puts your health at risk

Harvard Health Ad Watch: When marketing puts your health at risk

harvard - 2 months ago

The goal of advertising is, of course, to catch your attention and sell you a product. But when it comes to health-related products, inaccuracies in advertising can be detrimental to your health.

Perhaps youve seen a Vitamin Water ad recently that touts the health benefits of Vitamin Water while seeming to discourage getting a flu shot as out of fashion. It originally appeared in 2011 but has mysteriously resurfaced online. The text of the ad states, Flu shots are so last year, and subheadings add more vitamin C, more immunity, less snotty tissues. The average customer seeing this ad could conclude that flu shots arent so great in fact, that Vitamin Water is better for you than flu shots (and also better than getting the flu).

Vitamin Water wont help against flu

I have to admit, the ad does catch your attention. Buts its an unfortunate and potentially dangerous approach for a number of reasons:

  • The flu killed an estimated 61,000 people in the US during the 201718 flu season (a record, according to the CDC) and up to 646,000 people worldwide; the flu shot could prevent many of these deaths.
  • The flu shot is recommended every year thats because the strains of the influenza virus change each year and the vaccination is modified accordingly.
  • There is a large and growing anti-vax campaign that falsely argues that the risks of vaccinations far outweigh their benefits; this not only poses a threat to those who forego vaccination and become sick with the flu, but also to those with whom infected persons come into contact.

Im not the only one who took issue with this Vitamin Water campaign. The National Consumers League asked the Federal Trade Commission to ban the original ads, calling them dangerously misleading.

And then theres the added sugar

Vitamin Water is one of many products whose name suggests health benefits or health advantages compared with its competitors, yet their nutritional content may be less healthy than youd expect.

Read the label for Vitamin Water closely and youll see that it contains

  • 26 grams of sugar; thats equivalent to more than six teaspoons of sugar, and more than half of the recommended allowance of carbs in a day
  • no protein or fiber
  • ingredients sourced from genetically engineered crops (commonly known as GMOs).

True, Vitamin Water has 25% of the daily recommendation for Vitamin A and 100% of Vitamins C, B6, and B12 but the vast majority of people have no trouble getting plenty of these nutrients in the foods they eat.

Despite its name, theres no obvious health advantage to getting vitamins along with the empty calories in Vitamin Water. Eat an orange instead if youre seeking vitamin C at least it has some fiber. And if youre really worried you are not getting what you need from your diet, take a standard multivitamin and see your doctor.

Of course, you could choose the zero-calorie version of Vitamin Water (and I do enjoy Vitamin Water Zero on occasion). But then youre consuming the non-nutrient sweeteners, stevia and erythritol, the pros and cons of which we can debate another day.

Highly marketed supplements and diets versus proven treatments

For years, Ive seen ads in my Sunday newspapers and elsewhere recommending all sorts of unproven treatments in lieu of well-studied, well-established, FDA-approved medications that have been proven to save lives. Examples include supplements and diets that claim to lower blood pressure or cure arthritis without medications. While diet is an important part of hypertension treatment, medications are typically prescribed for people who have already tried unsuccessfully to lower their blood pressure with nonmedication approaches. Its potentially dangerous to suggest that you can stop blood pressure medications, as some glowing testimonials suggest especially if you do so with no monitoring.

And Ive seen many ads that proclaim, Heres a safe and all-natural cure for your condition that your doctor doesnt want you to know about. I dont know any doctors who are keeping effective treatments secret. Its an unfounded and cynical claim to suggest your doctor doesnt have your best interests at heart. Meanwhile, the people using these sales tactics drive a wedge between doctors and patients in an effort to promote unproven health products.

The bottom line

You could argue that a reasonable person should know that the Vitamin Water ad is not advocating for anyone to skip their flu shot and that its just a way to promote their product. I disagree. Reasonable people are constantly bombarded with a torrent of misinformation. It can be hard to know which sources to believe. Downplaying the risk of skipping flu shots can have devastating consequences across a population.

Marketing works. But I think health-related marketing should be held to higher standards than ads for clothes, cars, or furniture. Advertisers should tread carefully when it comes to well-studied treatments proven to save lives. And until influenza is eliminated as a yearly health risk, its irresponsible and, yes, dangerous to liken flu shots to an out-of-fashion trend just to sell a sugary drink.

Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling

The post Harvard Health Ad Watch: When marketing puts your health at risk appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

sauce: harvard
CLOSE