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Is your cell phone dangerous to your health? - harvard

Is your cell phone dangerous to your health?

Plenty of us use our phones in situations when we probably should be paying more attention. But how often does this behavior lead to actual injury? A data analysis offers some answers. The post Is your cell phone dangerous to your health? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 23 hours ago
Saying Goodbye to One-Sided Relationships - positively positive

Saying Goodbye to One-Sided Relationships

The problem is, it’s not that easy to call someone out or tell them you’re no longer going to stick around while they continue their selfish ways. We like to tell ourselves we’re strong enough to walk away, but it takes time, courage, and a lot of confidence to accept you’re not loving yourself by keeping this person in your life. It takes lots of self-love to walk away from a friend you’ve known all your life or a partner who you love because you know you’re hurting yourself by keeping them around. The post Saying Goodbye to One-Sided Relationships appeared first on Positively Positive.
positively positive - 1 day ago
LDL cholesterol: How low can you (safely) go? - harvard

LDL cholesterol: How low can you (safely) go?

Lowering LDL cholesterol has been shown to lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have suggested that more aggressive goals for LDL levels in people who already have CVD can decrease risk even further. The post LDL cholesterol: How low can you (safely) go? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 1 day ago
Menopause and insomnia: Could a low-GI diet help? - harvard

Menopause and insomnia: Could a low-GI diet help?

Researchers examining dietary data from over 50,000 postmenopausal women found that women who ate foods with a higher glycemic index, and foods with more added sugars, were more likely to have insomnia. The post Menopause and insomnia: Could a low-GI diet help? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 5 days ago
Diabetic retinopathy: Understanding diabetes-related eye disease and vision loss - harvard

Diabetic retinopathy: Understanding diabetes-related eye disease and vision loss

Over 7 million people have diabetic retinopathy, the most common form of vision loss in working-age adults with diabetes. It’s recommended that people with diabetes should work to keep blood pressure in the normal range and their A1c level below 7% to avoid complications such as diabetic retinopathy. The post Diabetic retinopathy: Understanding diabetes-related eye disease and vision loss appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 5 days ago
Coming clean: Your anesthesiologist needs to know about marijuana use before surgery - harvard

Coming clean: Your anesthesiologist needs to know about marijuana use before surgery

Regular marijuana users who need surgery should disclose their use ahead of the procedure, because of its effects on the body and on the anesthesia medications required for sedation. The post Coming clean: Your anesthesiologist needs to know about marijuana use before surgery appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 6 days ago
What to do when your child swears - harvard

What to do when your child swears

Even young children can surprise a parent with salty language. Regardless of where they first heard it, use the occasion to help your child learn appropriate behavior in and outside the home. The post What to do when your child swears appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 1 week ago
Are polypills and population-based treatment the next big things? - harvard

Are polypills and population-based treatment the next big things?

Combining multiple medications into a single pill, or polypill, is one approach to improving adherence (taking medication as prescribed). Depending on the conditions being treated, it may be easier for people to take a single pill, but there are also downsides to this approach. The post Are polypills and population-based treatment the next big things? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 1 week ago
Targeted Ultrasound Destroys Cancer Cells: Study  - web md

Targeted Ultrasound Destroys Cancer Cells: Study

Focused ultrasound is already used to destroy tumors, with most approaches using either high-intensity beams to heat and destroy cells or injected contrast dyes. But both approaches can harm healthy cells and contrast dyes work only for a minority of tumors.
web md - 1 week ago
What are ultra-processed foods and are they bad for our health? - harvard

What are ultra-processed foods and are they bad for our health?

Health advice tells us to eat less processed food, but what does that mean? Researchers compared diets with most of the calories from unprocessed foods and from ultra-processed foods, to see how the subjects were affected. The post What are ultra-processed foods and are they bad for our health? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 1 week ago
Harvard Health Ad Watch: When marketing puts your health at risk - harvard

Harvard Health Ad Watch: When marketing puts your health at risk

Can health marketing be harmful? Watch out for health ads that make misleading or even dangerous claims that an unproven product or treatment is better than a proven one. The post Harvard Health Ad Watch: When marketing puts your health at risk appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 1 week ago
Study: Young Women Getting Pelvic Exams They Don’t Need  - web md

Study: Young Women Getting Pelvic Exams They Don’t Need

The authors estimate that nearly one-quarter of young women aged 15-20 have received a pelvic exam in the last year. That’s 2.6 million girls. More than half of the exams -- 1.4 million -- may not have been needed.
web md - 2 weeks ago
What parents need to know about a vegan diet - harvard

What parents need to know about a vegan diet

If your family follows a vegan diet––or your child expresses the desire to do so on their own––it's important for parents to be aware of the nutritional challenges of vegan eating, and how to meet them. The post What parents need to know about a vegan diet appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
Vestibular migraine: Progress in the search for treatments - harvard

Vestibular migraine: Progress in the search for treatments

A sense of dizziness or spinning associated with migraine headache is called vestibular migraine. A small study found that a type of nerve stimulation treatment improved symptoms of vestibular migraine in study participants. The post Vestibular migraine: Progress in the search for treatments appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
Hiatus - positively psychological

Hiatus

Hello Everybody! It is good to take a minute to write again. It has been too long since I have posted on this blog. When I started the blog over the summer, I was feeling very inspired to read as much psychological research as possible in an effort to share it with you guys. This … Continue reading Hiatus →
positively psychological - 2 weeks ago
Why medical research keeps changing its mind - harvard

Why medical research keeps changing its mind

When a medical study announces findings that seem to say the opposite of what’s been understood and accepted about a particular condition or treatment, it can make you question all medical news. A study aimed to determine just how frequently this happens, and with which conditions. The post Why medical research keeps changing its mind appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
New Food Labels Help for Counting Calories, Sugar  - web md

New Food Labels Help for Counting Calories, Sugar

Foods with multiple servings in a single package -- like a big bag of potato chips -- will now have a two-column label that will list the nutrition information in a single serving alongside the calories, fat, cholesterol, protein, sugar, and sodium in the entire package.
web md - 2 weeks ago
Congenital heart disease and autism: A possible link? - harvard

Congenital heart disease and autism: A possible link?

A recent study confirms that people born with congenital heart disease have a significantly greater risk of being diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. The research highlights the need for autism screening in children with CHD as early as possible. The post Congenital heart disease and autism: A possible link? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
Breast Density Alerts Might Not Be Helping Women  - web md

Breast Density Alerts Might Not Be Helping Women

The goal of dense breast notifications is to spur a conversation between a woman and her health care provider. The provider can let a woman know how having dense breast tissue affects her personal risk of breast cancer or detecting it.
web md - 3 weeks ago
Getting sleep in the hospital - harvard

Getting sleep in the hospital

There are many things about hospital routines that make it difficult for patients to sleep well. If you find yourself hospitalized, there are things you can do to improve the chances that you will get a better nights sleep. The post Getting sleep in the hospital appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 3 weeks ago
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harvard
What parents need to know about a vegan diet

What parents need to know about a vegan diet

harvard - 2 weeks ago

A vegan diet is made up of only plant-based products no meat, fish, dairy, or eggs (some people also exclude honey). While these diets are still relatively rare, they are becoming more common. Some families or teens choose them for health reasons, and its certainly true that plant-based diets are low in saturated fat and can have other health benefits. Some choose them for philosophical reasons either sustainability, or not wanting to harm animals, or both.

Whatever the reason, its important to get educated before you begin. You should talk to your doctor, and if possible its a good idea to also meet with a nutritionist. Because while vegan diets can absolutely be healthy, there are some nutritional and other issues that can cause trouble if you arent careful.

Calories and protein for children eating a vegan diet

Two issues you should learn about and plan for are:

Calories. Plant-based foods tend to have fewer calories than animal-based ones. This is not a bad thing, given the current obesity epidemic in the US, but its important to be sure that children and teens get enough calories to grow and support daily activity. The number of calories a child needs will depend on their age, size, and activity level. Nuts, nut butters, and soy products can help add calories, as can granola and other whole-grain products.

Protein. Protein is crucial, not just for building muscle but for all sorts of body processes. This is another nutrient that is simply easier to get from animal products, as there is more of it and it is complete, meaning that it has all the amino acid building blocks that humans need. The protein you get from plant products is less accessible to the body and may or may not be complete and for that reason, people on vegan diets need to eat more protein than those on animal-based diets, to be on the safe side. As with calories, the amount of protein a child needs depends on their age and size. Nuts, legumes (including peanuts), soy products, and whole grains are good sources of protein.

Key minerals and vitamins for children eating a vegan diet

Consider sources for key minerals and vitamins:

Calcium. Calcium is important, especially for bone health. Dairy is the easiest source of calcium, but there are other ways to get it, including foods like kale, bok choy, and broccoli. Many alterna-milks such as soy milk and almond milk are fortified with calcium (and vitamin D), as are some brands of orange juice.

Iron. Iron is important to keep our blood and our bodies healthy and strong. Fortified cereals and some other plant products have iron, but its not a bad idea to give your child a multivitamin with iron.

Vitamin B12. This is another crucial nutrient that can be harder to get on a plant-based diet. While vegans can get it from soy beverages and fortified cereals, its another reason why a multivitamin is a good idea.

Vitamin D. While the main source of vitamin D is sunshine (really!), most of us dont spend enough time in the sun to get enough of it, and need to get it from our diet. If a child isnt going to get it from fortified dairy products, then a supplement is the way to go. For younger children, the 400 IU that is present in most multivitamins is enough; older children may need more. Talk to your doctor about what is best for your child.

Fiber. This is one thing that vegan diets may actually have too much of, given that plants have a lot of fiber. The most common problem with getting too much fiber is that it can fill you up, making it harder to get enough of the calories and other nutrients you need. Giving children some refined grains like cereals can help, as can giving peeled fruits and cooked vegetables rather than raw.

What else should you consider?

Its also helpful to consider the emotional aspects of being on a vegan diet. If your family is not vegan and your child is asking to be, its important to understand why. The reasons may be perfectly fine and healthy, but some children, especially teens, choose vegan diets in order to lose weight. If you suspect that your child may have an eating disorder, talk to your doctor.

Being on a restrictive diet can be difficult for some children, too, who may feel different from their peers, or excluded from group eating experiences like birthday parties. This is something that you should think about as parents and talk about as a family. If its important to you that your child adhere to a vegan diet in all settings, you should talk about strategies for navigating that, both in terms of making sure your child has food to eat in every setting, and in terms of helping them talk about their dietary choices with their friends.

Eating, after all, is about more than just feeding our bodies. Eating can and should be fun, no matter what diet we choose.

Follow me on Twitter @DrClaire

The post What parents need to know about a vegan diet appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

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