harvard
my fitness pal
my positive outlooks
positive
positive psychology news
positive sharing
positively positive
positively psychological
web md
count
sauces
help
I'm confused... What am I doing here?

Choose which sources you wish to remain and you're all set. Use the buttons to turn sources on and off.

What do the different colours mean?

Depending on if any articles/links are visible on the page there are 4 modes to show the state of your chosen sources.

on / visible on page

off / visible on page

on / not visible on page

off / not visible on page

AI Might Spot At-Risk COVID-19 Patients  - web md

AI Might Spot At-Risk COVID-19 Patients

Developed by U.S. and Chinese researchers, the artificial intelligence (AI) program has been tested at two hospitals in China with 53 patients who were diagnosed in January with COVID-19. The new tool is considered experimental and is now in testing.
web md - 10 hours ago
COVID-19 Slows Drug Studies, Curbs Clinical Trials  - web md

COVID-19 Slows Drug Studies, Curbs Clinical Trials

Most studies not considered critical are being deferred. This won’t have much effect in the short term, but if this continues, it could delay patient care and the federal approval of drugs that treat a wide range of conditions.
web md - 10 hours ago
Too Many Patients, Too Few Ventilators: How U.S. Hospitals Cope With COVID-19  - web md

Too Many Patients, Too Few Ventilators: How U.S. Hospitals Cope With COVID-19

Intensive care units at besieged hospitals in New York and other cities are taking an "all hands on deck" approach -- recruiting doctors from various specialties to help handle the influx of severely ill COVID-19 patients.
web md - 1 day ago
‘Red Dawn Breaking Bad’: Officials Warned About Safety Gear Shortfall Early On, Emails Show  - web md

‘Red Dawn Breaking Bad’: Officials Warned About Safety Gear Shortfall Early On, Emails Show

As President Donald Trump called the nation “in good shape” to handle COVID-19, a cache of emails released by officials in Washington state show that top public health authorities feared gear shortages and doctor safety in the early epicenter of sickness and deaths.
web md - 1 day ago
FDA Approves Test That Can Detect Coronavirus in Minutes  - web md

FDA Approves Test That Can Detect Coronavirus in Minutes

The US Food and Drug Administration granted the approval under its Emergency Use Authorization. Abbott said it will start distribution next week and will ramp up manufacturing to 50,000 tests per day.
web md - 1 day ago
Do Gene Mutations Explain Young COVID-19 Cases?  - web md

Do Gene Mutations Explain Young COVID-19 Cases?

Plans call for enrolling 500 patients worldwide who are under age 50, have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and admitted to an intensive care unit, and have no underlying health problems such as diabetes, heart disease or lung disease.
web md - 1 day ago
Have a headache? The top 7 triggers - harvard

Have a headache? The top 7 triggers

There are several common triggers for headaches. Identifying the one that is causing your headache is the first step toward avoiding it or ensuring you can treat it properly. The post Have a headache? The top 7 triggers appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 1 day ago
Shortages Looming for Respirators, Masks, Gowns  - web md

Shortages Looming for Respirators, Masks, Gowns

Only about 12% of facilities have been able to get supplemental PPE from federal resources, compared with 25% that have drawn from local donations and 17% from do-it-yourself efforts to cobble together masks and gowns, results show. State and local governments have supplied PPE to 29% of facilities surveyed.
web md - 4 days ago
How Three Countries Have Kept COVID-19 In Check  - web md

How Three Countries Have Kept COVID-19 In Check

Although the United States missed its chance to head off a COVID-19 epidemic, and is well on its way to becoming the pandemic's new epicenter, these lessons drawn from other countries could still be used to help manage infections in the months and years ahead, Adalja and Kullar said.
web md - 4 days ago
U.S. Hospital Beds Were Maxed Out Before Pandemic  - web md

U.S. Hospital Beds Were Maxed Out Before Pandemic

At Elmhurst Hospital Center, a 545-bed public hospital, doctors and nurses have only a few dozen ventilators for their patients, some of whom have died while waiting for a bed. A refrigerated truck has been stationed outside the hospital to hold the dead, the newspaper reported.
web md - 4 days ago
COVID-19: Dramatic Changes to Telepsychiatry Rules and Regs  - web md

COVID-19: Dramatic Changes to Telepsychiatry Rules and Regs

In the wake of drastic rule changes governing telemental health services during the COVID-19 outbreak, experts give the most up-to-date information on how to best navigate this ever-changing landscape.
web md - 4 days ago
Keep Calm: Under 25s With Diabetes Not Hospitalized Due to COVID-19  - web md

Keep Calm: Under 25s With Diabetes Not Hospitalized Due to COVID-19

Reassuringly, COVID-19 in under 25s with diabetes doesn't seem to require hospitalization, early reports from global hotspots indicate. But the pandemic means new cases of type 1 diabetes are being missed.
web md - 4 days ago
Livestock, Poultry Safe From Coronavirus: Expert  - web md

Livestock, Poultry Safe From Coronavirus: Expert

The low level of risk to livestock and poultry is good news for U.S. livestock producers, meat packers and consumers, who could use some stability as uncertainty about the coronavirus restricts many normal daily activities, Roth noted.
web md - 4 days ago
Severe COVID-19 Might Injure the Heart  - web md

Severe COVID-19 Might Injure the Heart

Doctors in China have already warned that heart injuries appear common in COVID-19 patients, particularly those with existing heart disease or high blood pressure. A recent, smaller study found that 12% of hospitalized patients had the complication.
web md - 4 days ago
Social Distancing May Be Working, New Study Hints  - web md

Social Distancing May Be Working, New Study Hints

Data show that the number of people with fever that's an early indication of coronavirus infection started falling almost immediately after social distancing measures took effect in some areas, USA Today reported.
web md - 5 days ago
Critics Lead Gilead to Drop Coronavirus Drug Status  - web md

Critics Lead Gilead to Drop Coronavirus Drug Status

Gilead asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to designate remdesivir a so-called orphan drug, saying it qualified as a rare disease because fewer than 200,000 Americans are infected with the coronavirus.
web md - 5 days ago
Young People Far From Immune to Coronavirus

Young People Far From Immune to Coronavirus' Bite

The data from China showed that older people were more likely to die. But Americans may have misunderstood the data that initially came out of China: that older people were most affected and younger ones were safe.
web md - 5 days ago
Wuhan Study Shows Social Distancing Saves Lives  - web md

Wuhan Study Shows Social Distancing Saves Lives

The closures significantly delayed the peak of the epidemic in Wuhan -- the epicenter of the worldwide pandemic -- and gave the health system the time and opportunity to grow and respond to the crisis, according to the study authors.
web md - 5 days ago
Commentary: What If There Is a Virtual ACC and Nobody Cares?  - web md

Commentary: What If There Is a Virtual ACC and Nobody Cares?

It seems tone-deaf to discuss science-that-can-wait while colleagues across the world fight this challenge, writes John Mandrola, MD, of the upcoming virtual American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions.
web md - 5 days ago
Expert: Coronavirus Isn

Expert: Coronavirus Isn't 'Alive,' But Still Harms

"A virus usually enters the cell through a protein our cells have on their surface. COVID-19 -- and SARS [severe acute respiratory syndrome] before that -- use a protein called ACE2, which is on the surface of the cells in our lung, throat and intestinal tract,"  Mendenhall said.
web md - 5 days ago
LOAD MORE HEALTH
harvard
my fitness pal
my positive outlooks
positive
positive psychology news
positive sharing
positively positive
positively psychological
web md
count
sauces
help
I'm confused... What am I doing here?

Choose which sources you wish to remain and you're all set. Use the buttons to turn sources on and off.

What do the different colours mean?

Depending on if any articles/links are visible on the page there are 4 modes to show the state of your chosen sources.

on / visible on page

off / visible on page

on / not visible on page

off / not visible on page

harvard
Can telehealth help flatten the curve of COVID-19?

Can telehealth help flatten the curve of COVID-19?

harvard - 1 week ago

Telehealth, the virtual care platforms that allow health care professionals and patients to meet by phone or video chat, seems tailor-made for this moment in time. Also known as telemedicine or digital health, its often touted as a convenience for patients who are busy or far away, or when travel isnt feasible due to severe weather or an urgent condition like a stroke. The current crisis makes virtual care solutions like telehealth an indispensable tool as COVID-19 spreads across US communities. As director of the Center for TeleHealth at Massachusetts General Hospital and vice president of virtual care for Partners Healthcare, I believe it can help flatten the curve of infections and help us to deploy medical staff and lifesaving equipment wisely.

How can telehealth help during the COVID-19 outbreak?

While its likely many people will become infected with the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, most will not get seriously ill. Those at greatest risk are over 60, or have underlying health conditions or a compromised immune system. The number one job for all of us is to avoid becoming a carrier and distributor of the virus. By using virtual care for much regular, necessary medical care, and deferring elective procedures or annual checkups, we free up medical staff and equipment needed for those who become seriously ill from COVID-19. Additionally, by not congregating in small spaces like waiting rooms, we thwart the ability of the virus to hop from one person to another. Keeping people apart is called social distancing. Keeping healthcare providers apart from patients and other providers is medical distancing. Telehealth is one strategy to help us accomplish this.

How can medical staff use telehealth to decide who should come to the hospital?

We think that patients with minor symptoms of COVID-19, such as cough and body aches, can rest at home, drinking fluids and treating this like any flulike illness. Test kits are in short supply and currently being used mainly for certain groups: for example, patients who are high-risk or seriously ill, and medical staff who have symptoms or have been exposed to COVID-19, to help prevent further spread of illness. Telehealth uses video chat, or even a simple phone call, to allow medical staff to ask specific questions and gather information to find out whether care is urgently needed, or if a person can continue to self-monitor symptoms at home while recovering. It can also be used for regular check-ins during recovery, as needed.

How can you make the best use of a clinicians time on the call?

In the US, health care providers are following guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), state and local health departments, and hospital infectious disease experts. The screening questions a clinician asks during the call help establish if a person is in a low-, medium-, or high-risk group, and if they have mild, moderate, or severe symptoms of upper respiratory infection that could be due to COVID-19.

By quickly and consistently gathering key information, the clinician you speak with can help determine if you need to see a doctor or go to the hospital for care, or if you are better off staying at home while recovering.

  • Before you call write down your symptoms, whether you have a fever, and whether youve taken any medicine.
  • Be ready to answer a few questions that might seem tedious or irrelevant, such as where you have traveled recently. As the infection becomes more widespread, travel questions will be less necessary, since it becomes more likely that you caught it within your own community.
  • Try to resist the urge to ask reasonable but nonmedical questions that are time-consuming: Should I cancel our family summer vacation? or Can I catch this from petting my neighbors dog? Many calls to triage hotlines go unanswered because call volumes are high. Keeping calls short allows clinicians to help more people. If you have questions about the coronavirus or COVID-19, visit reliable websites, such as the CDC or World Health Organization, to get answers. The CDC website offers information on how to protect yourself and what to do if youre sick.

What telehealth services are available to me?

If you have health insurance, find out if your plan has an option for telehealth services. If not, several well-known national companies provide services for a fixed fee. Your doctor may be able to suggest a specific service, or you can search for online urgent care or telehealth companies in US or telemedicine companies in US.

Medicare and many health plans are currently reimbursing many types of health care providers for telehealth visits.

How can we help one another?

These are challenging times. Let us look to each other for support, kindness, and compassion. We must protect and care for each other, and lend a hand where we can, all while keeping a safe distance. There is nothing we cannot endure if we keep our humanity front and center, and carefully steward our shared resources. We have enough key health care workers including but not limited to doctors; nurses; physical, occupational, speech, and respiratory therapists; and social workers to care for the sick if we can slow the pace at which infection is spreading. We need your help to manage this. Its well past opening night and we all have a part to play.

For more information about coronavirus and COVID-19, see the Harvard Health Publishing Coronavirus Resource Center.

The post Can telehealth help flatten the curve of COVID-19? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

sauce: harvard
CLOSE