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What the Pandemic Did to Workouts  - web md

What the Pandemic Did to Workouts

By June, just over 60% of those surveyed said they were meeting World Health Organization's guidelines for weekly exercise, representing a nearly 8% jump from pre-pandemic routines. Investigators also found a more than 11% jump in the number of people who were actually exceeding that threshold.
web md - 6 days ago
Is Ablation Rx the Best First Choice for A-Fib?  - web md

Is Ablation Rx the Best First Choice for A-Fib?

A-fib patients who underwent ablation were half as likely to have an arrhythmia episode in the following year compared to patients on medication. And they were 61% less likely to have an episode that caused symptoms.
web md - 6 days ago
Poll: Many Will Attend Large Indoor Holiday Events  - web md

Poll: Many Will Attend Large Indoor Holiday Events

And while many plan to take precautions -- such as social distancing and asking those with COVID-19 symptoms not to attend holiday gatherings -- one-third of respondents said they won't ask guests to wear masks.
web md - 1 week ago
Does lupus or arthritis affect your prognosis if you get COVID-19? - harvard

Does lupus or arthritis affect your prognosis if you get COVID-19?

People with certain chronic conditions are at increased risk for severe COVID-19. These include a compromised immune system, which can happen for a number of reasons. Many people with rheumatoid arthritis or lupus take drugs that suppress the immune system, and new research examined the risks associated with such a situation. The post Does lupus or arthritis affect your prognosis if you get COVID-19? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
Coping With IBS - harvard

Coping With IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex and painful condition. Its cause is unknown and there is no cure, so treatment focuses on day-to-day management, but often people need additional assistance beyond medical care to cope with emotional side of living with IBS. The post Coping With IBS appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
Lies Spread on Social Media Hamper Vaccinations  - web md

Lies Spread on Social Media Hamper Vaccinations

Every 1 point increase in the effort to discredit vaccines is linked to an average 2% drop in annual vaccine coverage around the world, and a 15% increase in negative tweets about vaccination, researchers found.
web md - 3 weeks ago
Supersreaders Spur Record New U.S. COVID Cases  - web md

Supersreaders Spur Record New U.S. COVID Cases

The Johns Hopkins University Coronavirus Resource Center reported that 88,521 new coronavirus cases were recorded Thursday in the United States -- the most in a single day since the start of the pandemic.
web md - 3 weeks ago
The Pandemic Diet: How to Lose the ‘Quarantine 15’  - web md

The Pandemic Diet: How to Lose the ‘Quarantine 15’

Another survey, done in August by RunRepeat, found that 41% of the 10,000+ respondents in the U.S. had gained more than 5 pounds since quarantine began -- and those are people visiting a website devoted to running.
web md - 3 weeks ago
Manage Risk to Stay Safe for COVID Thanksgiving  - web md

Manage Risk to Stay Safe for COVID Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving will be another holiday impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, with the CDC and other experts recommending either significantly scaled-down, socially distanced activities or replacing the usual traditions with virtual ones to avoid exposure to the airborne illness.
web md - 3 weeks ago
Psoriasis Meds Don

Psoriasis Meds Don't Raise Risk of Severe COVID-19

Moderate-to-severe cases of psoriasis are treated with drugs that suppress the immune system. This analysis of the international PsoProtect registry found that more than 90% of psoriasis patients survive infection with the new coronavirus.
web md - 3 weeks ago
Making special education work for your child during COVID-19 - harvard

Making special education work for your child during COVID-19

The pandemic has forced parents everywhere to face problems that don’t have clear solutions regarding their children’s schooling. For parents of children with disabilities who receive special education, these concerns are even more challenging, and parental choices are even more difficult. The post Making special education work for your child during COVID-19 appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 4 weeks ago
Searching for Clues to COVID-19 Immunity  - web md

Searching for Clues to COVID-19 Immunity

Getting more specific answers about how the immune system responds to the virus that causes COVID-19, including whether recovery is likely permanent, is crucial not only to those who have recovered. These answers can help inform vaccine makers to make the most effective vaccines as well.
web md - 1 month ago
Hispanic Women More Prone to COVID in Pregnancy  - web md

Hispanic Women More Prone to COVID in Pregnancy

The researchers collected data on more than 900 Hispanic, Black, Asian and white patients. Among Hispanic women, nearly 11% tested positive for COVID-19, compared with 5.5% of non-Hispanic patients, the findings showed.
web md - 1 month ago
Mask Use by Americans Now Tops 90%, Poll Finds  - web md

Mask Use by Americans Now Tops 90%, Poll Finds

More than nine in 10 U.S. adults (93%) said they sometimes, often or always wear a mask or face covering when they leave their home and are unable to socially distance, including more than seven in 10 (72%) who said they always do so, the poll revealed.
web md - 1 month ago
Half of Americans Know Someone Impacted by COVID  - web md

Half of Americans Know Someone Impacted by COVID

The national survey was conducted by The Harris Poll between Oct. 8 and 12. It found that 55% of U.S. adults now say they know someone in their immediate or extended network of family and acquaintances who's been infected, hospitalized or passed away from COVID-19.
web md - 1 month ago
One Big Reason Women May Be Less Prone to COVID-19  - web md

One Big Reason Women May Be Less Prone to COVID-19

A survey conducted in eight countries in March and April found substantial gender differences both in numbers of people who considered COVID-19 to be a serious health crisis and who agreed with public policies to help fight the pandemic.
web md - 1 month ago
FDA Warns of Painkiller Risk During Pregnancy  - web md

FDA Warns of Painkiller Risk During Pregnancy

The FDA warned on Thursday that taking widely used painkillers called NSAIDS -- which include Advil, Motrin, Aleve and Celebrex -- at 20 weeks or later in a pregnancy could raise the risk of complications.
web md - 1 month ago
No Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine Before Election  - web md

No Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine Before Election

Even though Pfizer could have preliminary data about the vaccine's effectiveness by the end of October, gathering safety and manufacturing data would take until at least the third week of November, Dr. Albert Bourla said in the statement.
web md - 1 month ago
Heart Defects Don

Heart Defects Don't Increase Risk of Severe COVID

Among the 43 adults and 10 children with a congenital heart defect who were infected with COVID-19, 58% had complex congenital anatomy, 15% had a genetic syndrome, 11% had pulmonary hypertension and 17% were obese.
web md - 1 month ago
Is Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?  - web md

Is Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?

The nine-year study of more than 2,000 older adults -- average age 74 -- found that people with severe apathy (a lack of interest or concern) were 80% more likely to develop dementia during the study period than those with low apathy.
web md - 1 month ago
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harvard
Making special education work for your child during COVID-19

Making special education work for your child during COVID-19

harvard - 4 weeks ago

Even in normal times, parents wrestle with decisions about how best to support their childrens development. Now, however, parents are faced with nearly-unprecedented choices, and problems with no clear solutions: What if in-person schooling is better for emotional health, but remote schooling is better for physical health? How can children foster social skills without typical social interactions? How can parents select among learning environments when all the options have clear downsides?

These concerns and choices are even more difficult for parents of children with disabilities, who are among the most vulnerable students and who are at increased risk of regression during school disruptions.

Special education: One size does not fit all

Of course, students who receive special education are not a uniform group. They range in age from 3 to 22, attending preschool through post-secondary placements. They include students with a wide variety of mild to severe cognitive, physical, social, emotional, and behavioral disabilities.

But students with disabilities share a need for special services, accommodations, or both, in order to fully access the school curriculum, and to make meaningful progress appropriate to their ability. At a time when schools are scrambling to deliver regular education in a novel and frightening new context, parents and educators must also work together to select and design appropriate programs for students with special needs.

Remote learning

Remote learning has two obvious benefits. First, it is the safest choice from a physical health perspective; it may indeed be the only choice for students who are medically fragile. Second, remote learning is less likely to be disrupted or changed over the course of the school year. Students who struggle with transitions or anxiety may benefit from the relatively predictable course of remote learning.

But remote learning also carries risks, some of which are particularly acute for students with disabilities. When children are at home, educators may not be able to deliver some services or accommodations. It may be more difficult, or even impossible, to work toward some goals, especially those that require proximity to or interaction with others, such as independently toileting, or purchasing lunch in the school cafeteria without adult support.

Remote learning also requires flexibility in parents schedules, and intensive parental participation. Even with parental involvement, students vary in how effectively they can engage with remote learning. And students who struggle with attention, intellectual functioning, language, self-regulation, or a combination of these challenges may have great difficulty learning efficiently from a remote platform. The lack of peer models may lead some children to regress behaviorally or academically.

In-person learning

In-person or hybrid (a combination of remote and in-person learning) models offer most of the benefits that remote options lack. These include a social environment with peers, and access to services and accommodations in as normal an environment as possible. Students who require intensive support, hands-on services, or who are working on skills specific to the school or vocational environment may require in-person learning opportunities in order to fully access the curriculum.

However, in-person models carry one major and obvious risk: the potential of increased exposure to COVID-19. All parents must be wary of this dangerous disease, and parents of medically complex children may deem such a risk unacceptable, despite potential academic or social benefits.

In-person models are also likely to evolve as the pandemic progresses. As a result, students will require greater flexibility in order to be successful at a physical school.

What should parents do?

Parents and educators will need to approach this challenge with creativity, flexibility, and collaboration. Parents should request to meet with their childs educational team as soon as possible, and should plan to meet regularly thereafter to monitor their childs progress, and to update the educational program as needed. When parents meet with their team, they should consider each goal and service with an open mind, discussing multiple options for how a goal could be met, and how a service or accommodation could be delivered.

Some adaptations are easy: for example, large print, screen-reading software, and speech-to-text are all immediately available in a remote context. Other adaptations pose challenges, but not necessarily insurmountable ones. A behavior analyst could offer coaching through a video call, for example. Or a teacher certified in intensive special education could deliver discrete trials instruction remotely by positioning two tablets in the childs home, one for the child to use, and one as a screen to watch the childs responses. An aide or behavioral support could join a childs virtual classroom, and chat with or break out with the child as needed to offer support.

Now is the time for innovation, and many schools and families are discovering great new ways to deliver special education instruction safely and effectively.

Put schooling in perspective

While it can seem like there are no great options for school, parents should try to take comfort in accepting that this year, good enough is truly enough.

We should also strive to prioritize the things that children require even more than schooling: physical and emotional safety, a responsive adult, and unconditional love and acceptance. Children who feel safe and loved will emerge from this pandemic resilient, and ready to overcome other challenges in their future and they may even have learned a thing or two along the way.

 

Resources

Autism Speaks COVID Resources

Child Trends (includes multiple excellent articles about supporting children through COVID-19)

Harvard’s Center for the Developing Child Guide to COVID-19 and Early Child Development

Helping Traumatized Children Learn, a collaborative work of MA Advocates for Children and Harvard Law School

Learning Policy Institute Resources and Examples

PTA Resources

US Department of Education resources for schools, students and families

The post Making special education work for your child during COVID-19 appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

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