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Defeat Your Inner Critic with Just 4 Words - positively positive

Defeat Your Inner Critic with Just 4 Words

This four-word phrase will change the game for you forever. The inner critic works to erode your confidence, to take away your belief in yourself and your capabilities. It wants to make you live in a perpetual state of fear, doubt, worry and anxiety. The post Defeat Your Inner Critic with Just 4 Words appeared first on Positively Positive.
positively positive - 1 week ago
The Cult Of Overwork - positive sharing

The Cult Of Overwork

60-hour workweeks kill people. That seems bad and we should probably stop it. In these videos I explain how we get back to or even below 40 hours of work a week. References from the videos CNN’s article on “The Secrets Of Greatness. Jack Ma and the 996 Rule. Working hours in different countries. The … Continue reading The Cult Of Overwork →
Beyond COVID-19: Can mRNA Treat Diseases, Too?  - web md

Beyond COVID-19: Can mRNA Treat Diseases, Too?

The safety and effectiveness of the new vaccines, and the breakneck speed at which they were developed, have spotlighted the potential for other medicinal uses of mRNA. And the future looks promising.
web md - 2 weeks ago
Improving PET scans are good news for doctors and patients alike - harvard

Improving PET scans are good news for doctors and patients alike

A recent blog post discussed a newly approved imaging agent with an unwieldy name: gallium-68 PMA-11. Delivered in small amounts by injection, this minimally radioactive tracer sticks to prostate cancer cells, which subsequently glow and reveal themselves on a positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Offered to men with rising PSA levels after initial prostate cancer […] The post Improving PET scans are good news for doctors and patients alike appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 3 weeks ago
Tampa’s Mayor vs. a Covid-Era Super Bowl  - web md

Tampa’s Mayor vs. a Covid-Era Super Bowl

Tampa Mayor Jane Castor — an outspoken former cop — has clashed repeatedly with Gov. Ron DeSantis, who has limited what local officials can do to confront the pandemic. But she reached an uneasy peace with the state and is convinced that safeguards instituted by the NFL will help keep crowds safe at the NFL championship game.
web md - 1 month ago
Trump or Biden – who’s the better boss? - positive sharing

Trump or Biden – who’s the better boss?

We all know how their policies differ, but how are Trump and Biden different as bosses? And who would you rather work for? References from the video: Alfie Kohn – “No Contest : The Case Against Competition” Philip Rucker and Carol Loennig – “A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump’s Testing of America” Npr interview … Continue reading Trump or Biden – who’s the better boss? →
COVID-19 Vaccine: How Best to Prepare  - web md

COVID-19 Vaccine: How Best to Prepare

Among the suggestions circulating online, including some with little or no research backing them up, are recommendations to pre-dose with allergy medicine, take common painkillers ahead of time, skip alcohol the day before, and many others.
web md - 1 month ago
Lung Disease: Get Back into Exercise  - web md

Lung Disease: Get Back into Exercise

Chronic lung disease can make you feel breathless and sap your muscle tone. You may be afraid to exercise or do the activities you once enjoyed. Exercise is not only safe with lung disease, it improves your breathing, strength, and self-esteem. Find out how to get back into exercise if your lung disease has sidelined you recently.
web md - 1 month ago
Feds Authorize $3 Billion to Boost Vaccine Rollout  - web md

Feds Authorize $3 Billion to Boost Vaccine Rollout

The news comes days after President-elect Joe Biden said he planned to release all available doses of vaccine after he takes office on Jan. 20. The Trump administration has been holding back millions of doses to ensure supply of vaccine to provide the necessary second dose for those who received the first shot.
web md - 1 month ago
Hormonal therapies for advanced prostate cancer linked to a higher risk of falls and fractures - harvard

Hormonal therapies for advanced prostate cancer linked to a higher risk of falls and fractures

Falls rank among the top causes of death and injuries among the elderly, and the risk increases significantly in older people being treated for cancer. Now, investigators are reporting that a newer class of drugs for advanced prostate cancer is associated with a significant increase in fall risk. Called androgen receptor inhibitors, or ARIs, these […] The post Hormonal therapies for advanced prostate cancer linked to a higher risk of falls and fractures appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 1 month ago
New high-resolution imaging scans approved for use in prostate cancer - harvard

New high-resolution imaging scans approved for use in prostate cancer

Imagine trying to find a single match from a book of matches in a large room. Not an easy task, right? But if the lights were dimmed and the match was lit, then its location would be immediately apparent. This is the basic idea behind PSMA imaging, a newly approved method for detecting prostate cancer […] The post New high-resolution imaging scans approved for use in prostate cancer appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 months ago
RA: What Doctors Might Not Tell You  - web md

RA: What Doctors Might Not Tell You

What is life really like with rheumatoid arthritis? When you’re diagnosed with RA, your doctor may talk with you about joint pain and medications to treat it. But later, RA can cause fatigue, morning stiffness, or anxiety, and put you at risk for other autoimmune diseases too. Find out what to expect and how to cope.
web md - 2 months ago
Pandemic Drives Couples to Divorce or to Seek Help  - web md

Pandemic Drives Couples to Divorce or to Seek Help

In the U.S., sales of online self-help divorce agreements rose by 34% this spring compared to last year, and family lawyers surveyed in April and July reported a 25% to 35% increase in requests to start divorce proceedings compared to the same time in 2019.
web md - 2 months ago
Gender fluidity: What it means and why support matters - harvard

Gender fluidity: What it means and why support matters

Gender fluidity refers to changes over time in gender identity and gender expression. For many people, gender identity and expression develop early and stay the same; for others, one or both may change. Understanding and supporting young people exploring gender is important to their emotional and physical well-being. The post Gender fluidity: What it means and why support matters appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 months ago
The sequence of hormonal therapy and radiation affects outcomes in men treated for prostate cancer - harvard

The sequence of hormonal therapy and radiation affects outcomes in men treated for prostate cancer

A common treatment for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is to combine radiation with drugs that block testosterone — a hormone that makes the tumors grow faster. (This type of treatment is also called androgen deprivation therapy, or ADT). New research is suggesting the sequence of these treatments may be crucially important. Dr. Dan Spratt, […] The post The sequence of hormonal therapy and radiation affects outcomes in men treated for prostate cancer appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 3 months ago
What the Pandemic Did to Workouts  - web md

What the Pandemic Did to Workouts

By June, just over 60% of those surveyed said they were meeting World Health Organization's guidelines for weekly exercise, representing a nearly 8% jump from pre-pandemic routines. Investigators also found a more than 11% jump in the number of people who were actually exceeding that threshold.
web md - 3 months ago
Is Ablation Rx the Best First Choice for A-Fib?  - web md

Is Ablation Rx the Best First Choice for A-Fib?

A-fib patients who underwent ablation were half as likely to have an arrhythmia episode in the following year compared to patients on medication. And they were 61% less likely to have an episode that caused symptoms.
web md - 3 months ago
Poll: Many Will Attend Large Indoor Holiday Events  - web md

Poll: Many Will Attend Large Indoor Holiday Events

And while many plan to take precautions -- such as social distancing and asking those with COVID-19 symptoms not to attend holiday gatherings -- one-third of respondents said they won't ask guests to wear masks.
web md - 3 months ago
Does lupus or arthritis affect your prognosis if you get COVID-19? - harvard

Does lupus or arthritis affect your prognosis if you get COVID-19?

People with certain chronic conditions are at increased risk for severe COVID-19. These include a compromised immune system, which can happen for a number of reasons. Many people with rheumatoid arthritis or lupus take drugs that suppress the immune system, and new research examined the risks associated with such a situation. The post Does lupus or arthritis affect your prognosis if you get COVID-19? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 3 months ago
Coping With IBS - harvard

Coping With IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex and painful condition. Its cause is unknown and there is no cure, so treatment focuses on day-to-day management, but often people need additional assistance beyond medical care to cope with emotional side of living with IBS. The post Coping With IBS appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 3 months ago
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harvard
Making special education work for your child during COVID-19

Making special education work for your child during COVID-19

harvard - 4 months ago

Even in normal times, parents wrestle with decisions about how best to support their childrens development. Now, however, parents are faced with nearly-unprecedented choices, and problems with no clear solutions: What if in-person schooling is better for emotional health, but remote schooling is better for physical health? How can children foster social skills without typical social interactions? How can parents select among learning environments when all the options have clear downsides?

These concerns and choices are even more difficult for parents of children with disabilities, who are among the most vulnerable students and who are at increased risk of regression during school disruptions.

Special education: One size does not fit all

Of course, students who receive special education are not a uniform group. They range in age from 3 to 22, attending preschool through post-secondary placements. They include students with a wide variety of mild to severe cognitive, physical, social, emotional, and behavioral disabilities.

But students with disabilities share a need for special services, accommodations, or both, in order to fully access the school curriculum, and to make meaningful progress appropriate to their ability. At a time when schools are scrambling to deliver regular education in a novel and frightening new context, parents and educators must also work together to select and design appropriate programs for students with special needs.

Remote learning

Remote learning has two obvious benefits. First, it is the safest choice from a physical health perspective; it may indeed be the only choice for students who are medically fragile. Second, remote learning is less likely to be disrupted or changed over the course of the school year. Students who struggle with transitions or anxiety may benefit from the relatively predictable course of remote learning.

But remote learning also carries risks, some of which are particularly acute for students with disabilities. When children are at home, educators may not be able to deliver some services or accommodations. It may be more difficult, or even impossible, to work toward some goals, especially those that require proximity to or interaction with others, such as independently toileting, or purchasing lunch in the school cafeteria without adult support.

Remote learning also requires flexibility in parents schedules, and intensive parental participation. Even with parental involvement, students vary in how effectively they can engage with remote learning. And students who struggle with attention, intellectual functioning, language, self-regulation, or a combination of these challenges may have great difficulty learning efficiently from a remote platform. The lack of peer models may lead some children to regress behaviorally or academically.

In-person learning

In-person or hybrid (a combination of remote and in-person learning) models offer most of the benefits that remote options lack. These include a social environment with peers, and access to services and accommodations in as normal an environment as possible. Students who require intensive support, hands-on services, or who are working on skills specific to the school or vocational environment may require in-person learning opportunities in order to fully access the curriculum.

However, in-person models carry one major and obvious risk: the potential of increased exposure to COVID-19. All parents must be wary of this dangerous disease, and parents of medically complex children may deem such a risk unacceptable, despite potential academic or social benefits.

In-person models are also likely to evolve as the pandemic progresses. As a result, students will require greater flexibility in order to be successful at a physical school.

What should parents do?

Parents and educators will need to approach this challenge with creativity, flexibility, and collaboration. Parents should request to meet with their childs educational team as soon as possible, and should plan to meet regularly thereafter to monitor their childs progress, and to update the educational program as needed. When parents meet with their team, they should consider each goal and service with an open mind, discussing multiple options for how a goal could be met, and how a service or accommodation could be delivered.

Some adaptations are easy: for example, large print, screen-reading software, and speech-to-text are all immediately available in a remote context. Other adaptations pose challenges, but not necessarily insurmountable ones. A behavior analyst could offer coaching through a video call, for example. Or a teacher certified in intensive special education could deliver discrete trials instruction remotely by positioning two tablets in the childs home, one for the child to use, and one as a screen to watch the childs responses. An aide or behavioral support could join a childs virtual classroom, and chat with or break out with the child as needed to offer support.

Now is the time for innovation, and many schools and families are discovering great new ways to deliver special education instruction safely and effectively.

Put schooling in perspective

While it can seem like there are no great options for school, parents should try to take comfort in accepting that this year, good enough is truly enough.

We should also strive to prioritize the things that children require even more than schooling: physical and emotional safety, a responsive adult, and unconditional love and acceptance. Children who feel safe and loved will emerge from this pandemic resilient, and ready to overcome other challenges in their future and they may even have learned a thing or two along the way.

 

Resources

Autism Speaks COVID Resources

Child Trends (includes multiple excellent articles about supporting children through COVID-19)

Harvard’s Center for the Developing Child Guide to COVID-19 and Early Child Development

Helping Traumatized Children Learn, a collaborative work of MA Advocates for Children and Harvard Law School

Learning Policy Institute Resources and Examples

PTA Resources

US Department of Education resources for schools, students and families

The post Making special education work for your child during COVID-19 appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

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