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Will Coffee Shop Culture Survive COVID-19?  - web md

Will Coffee Shop Culture Survive COVID-19?

The days of lounging in comfy chairs or at tables inside coffee shops as soothing music plays in the background, tip-tapping on your laptop or reading a newspaper, appear to be a thing of the past, at least for now.
web md - 2 days ago
Are Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?  - web md

Are Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?

Looking at two decades' worth of data on U.S. adults, the study found generational differences in tests of cognitive function. That refers to essential mental abilities such as remembering, reasoning and problem-solving.
web md - 3 days ago
School, camp, daycare, and sports physicals: What to do in the time of COVID-19 - harvard

School, camp, daycare, and sports physicals: What to do in the time of COVID-19

Summer activities are underway and some schools will be reopening come September. Does your child need a physical exam, or a form from the pediatrician? Here's how to think through the options for fulfilling these requirements. The post School, camp, daycare, and sports physicals: What to do in the time of COVID-19 appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 5 days ago
Young Black Americans at High Risk of Hypertension  - web md

Young Black Americans at High Risk of Hypertension

The study, of 18- to 44-year-olds in the United States, found that high blood pressure was prevalent across all racial groups: Among both white and Mexican American participants, 22% had the condition.
web md - 6 days ago
Wondering about goosebumps? Of course you are - harvard

Wondering about goosebumps? Of course you are

What are goosebumps? Why do we get them? Do they serve a purpose? Some of these questions can be answered, others can’t. But a recent study in mice links goosebumps to stem cells responsible for the regeneration of hair. The post Wondering about goosebumps? Of course you are appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 6 days ago
Another Effect of COVID: Lasting Hearing Problems?  - web md

Another Effect of COVID: Lasting Hearing Problems?

When the patients were asked if they had any changes in their hearing, 13% said it was worse. Eight patients said their hearing had deteriorated and eight said they had tinnitus (ringing in the ears).
web md - 1 week ago
Study Reveals How Coronavirus Travels Indoors  - web md

Study Reveals How Coronavirus Travels Indoors

For the study, they created a model of how these aerosols travel in indoor spaces such rooms, elevators and supermarkets. They also compared how the virus did in various types of ventilation and with different spacing of people within a room.
web md - 1 week ago
Pandemic Could Complicate Hurricane Season  - web md

Pandemic Could Complicate Hurricane Season

The average hurricane season has about 12 named storms, but up to 20 storms are being predicted this season, according to Marshall Shepherd, director of the Atmospheric Sciences Program at the University of Georgia.
web md - 1 week ago
New Study Shows Kids Are COVID Spreaders, Too  - web md

New Study Shows Kids Are COVID Spreaders, Too

Coronavirus testing performed in Chicago in March and April shows that children and teens tend to have as much virus in their nasal passages as adults, according to a research letter published online July 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.
web md - 1 week ago
One Disease Mosquitoes Don

One Disease Mosquitoes Don't Spread: Coronavirus

The researchers found that the new coronavirus can't replicate in three common species of mosquitoes -- Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus -- and therefore cannot be transmitted to humans.
web md - 1 week ago
Common Diabetes Meds Tied to Complication Risk  - web md

Common Diabetes Meds Tied to Complication Risk

People taking a class of diabetes medications called SGLT2s have up to three times the risk for a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) compared to people taking another drug, new research reveals.
web md - 1 week ago
Yet Another Study Finds Vaccines Are Safe  - web md

Yet Another Study Finds Vaccines Are Safe

Vaccine hesitancy among Americans has been highlighted as a potential problem in the nation's response to the COVID-19 pandemic, with some experts concerned that too many folks simply won't get a coronavirus vaccine even if one proves safe and effective.
web md - 1 week ago
Concussion Ups Odds for Many Brain Conditions  - web md

Concussion Ups Odds for Many Brain Conditions

The study of more than 186,000 Canadians found that those who suffered a concussion were more likely to develop any of several conditions, including: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); depression or anxiety; Parkinson's disease; or dementia.
web md - 1 week ago
Survivors

Survivors' COVID Antibodies May Be a Powerful Gift

These antibodies are among the most potent against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and could be produced by drug companies in large quantities, according to a team from Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
web md - 1 week ago
WebMD Poll: Most Would Wait on COVID Vaccine  - web md

WebMD Poll: Most Would Wait on COVID Vaccine

Fewer than half of people plan to get a coronavirus vaccine in the first year it’s available, and an even smaller group -- fewer than a third -- say they’ll get it in the first 90 days, a new WebMD reader poll finds.
web md - 1 week ago
In Rush to Publish, Some COVID Studies Not Reliable  - web md

In Rush to Publish, Some COVID Studies Not Reliable

Only 75 out of 664 clinical trials for COVID-19 -- about 11% -- have all the hallmarks of a scientific study that could be expected to produce solid results, according to the study published online July 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
web md - 1 week ago
Doctors Worry About COVID

Doctors Worry About COVID's Effects on Hispanics

While race and ethnicity data about the coronavirus isn’t complete, the reported numbers so far suggest Hispanic American adults of any race are disproportionately represented in certain coronavirus measures:
web md - 1 week ago
Will COVID Vaccine Trials Reflect U.S. Diversity?  - web md

Will COVID Vaccine Trials Reflect U.S. Diversity?

Although racial minorities, older people and those with underlying medical conditions are most at risk from COVID-19, they’ve historically been the least likely to be included in clinical trials for treatments for serious diseases. Will that change with COVID-19?
web md - 1 week ago
Another COVID Mystery: Why Some Fall Ill  Twice  - web md

Another COVID Mystery: Why Some Fall Ill Twice

Experts are puzzling over cases where people have had COVID-19 twice. There’s been no comprehensive study of cases like this, and no one knows yet whether reinfection is possible, especially so soon after someone has recovered.
web md - 2 weeks ago
Does air pollution cause Alzheimer’s disease? - harvard

Does air pollution cause Alzheimer’s disease?

It has been known for some time that air pollution causes heart and lung diseases. Now, results from three different studies on populations in different parts of the world show an association between higher levels of air pollution and greater risk of cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. The post Does air pollution cause Alzheimer’s disease? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
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Summer’s here, teens and parents — now what?

Summer’s here, teens and parents — now what?

harvard - 1 month ago

Summer is upon us, and for many teens in this country, school’s already out. Now what? Typical and cherished summer activities like jobs, internships, and camps may be on hold. There is a general sense of uncertainty about what the coming months will bring, and higher levels of worry in cities and states that struggled with many cases of COVID-19. This is going to be a very different summer than usual for many teenagers and their families. As the weather heats up, here are four tips to guide parents in helping their teens plan for the months ahead.

Validate your teen’s reaction to current circumstances

Teens may be feeling disappointed, anxious, and/or sad about cancelled activities and events. They may have a sense of uncertainty about what is to come. They may also be missing friends and feeling socially isolated. While it can be tempting as a parent to jump into problem-solving mode when you see your teen in distress, first take some time to listen to their concerns. Express their worries back to them, letting them know that you hear what they are saying through your words, tone, and expression. Its more important to help your teen feel heard and understood than to try to fix the problem in that moment.

Enlist your teen’s help in mapping out a daily structure

This could mean agreeing on rough times for meals, wake-up and bedtime, and incorporating physical activity into each day. (Accept that most teens like going to bed later and sleeping later than they did when they were younger.) Next, brainstorm together about how to fill the remaining time. Strike a balance between structure and down time, incorporating expectations for screens into the plan. Having a voice in these decisions and the opportunity to make adjustments as time goes by matter to teens. As you map out a plan together, keep in mind that boredom is not the enemy. While we, as a culture, have become less accustomed to down time and boredom in our daily lives, there are benefits to both.

Ask your teen which goals or hobbies they want to master or develop

Help teens decide on appropriate goals or hobbies to pursue over the course of the summer. Are they interested in learning to drive a car? Cook meals? Walk dogs or pet-sit? Maybe learn a language or take a course? Family resources need to factor into whats possible, of course. Once they decide what they want to accomplish, help them sketch out a roadmap and action steps toward these goals. Determine how you, as a parent, can provide some scaffolding during this process while also supporting and celebrating your teens autonomy.

Set clear guidelines around socializing

The coronavirus hasnt disappeared, so try to stay aware of how its affecting your community. Decide on guidelines and expectations for your family members in terms of social distancing and preventive measures, such as washing hands often and wearing face masks when distancing isnt possible. Families may differ in their approaches, depending on how vulnerable family members might be to illness as well as other factors.

Talk to your teen about what these decisions will mean for various social interactions. Take stock of how secure or leaky your family bubble has been, in terms of the interactions you have had with people outside of the family over the past few months, and discuss any changes for the summer. Be explicit. What will this mean for your teens interactions with friends and extended family members? What about wearing masks, trips to stores, and joining in various indoor and outdoor activities? Be clear about which rules and expectations are non-negotiable and which are negotiable based on your familys risk factors, state guidelines, and your own threshold for safety. Your teen will likely face challenges and obstacles in following these plans, so it can be helpful to anticipate these in advance and recruit your teen in problem-solving how to manage them.

It all boils down to listening to your teen and empowering them to take an active role in planning. While this likely isnt going to be the summer theyd planned on, with luck it will still hold joyful moments and opportunities to develop resilience and a sense of autonomy.

For more information on coronavirus and COVID-19, see the Harvard Health Publishing Coronavirus Resource Center and our Parenting in a Pandemic webcast.

The post Summers here, teens and parents now what? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

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