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Will Coffee Shop Culture Survive COVID-19?  - web md

Will Coffee Shop Culture Survive COVID-19?

The days of lounging in comfy chairs or at tables inside coffee shops as soothing music plays in the background, tip-tapping on your laptop or reading a newspaper, appear to be a thing of the past, at least for now.
web md - 2 days ago
Are Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?  - web md

Are Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?

Looking at two decades' worth of data on U.S. adults, the study found generational differences in tests of cognitive function. That refers to essential mental abilities such as remembering, reasoning and problem-solving.
web md - 3 days ago
School, camp, daycare, and sports physicals: What to do in the time of COVID-19 - harvard

School, camp, daycare, and sports physicals: What to do in the time of COVID-19

Summer activities are underway and some schools will be reopening come September. Does your child need a physical exam, or a form from the pediatrician? Here's how to think through the options for fulfilling these requirements. The post School, camp, daycare, and sports physicals: What to do in the time of COVID-19 appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 5 days ago
Young Black Americans at High Risk of Hypertension  - web md

Young Black Americans at High Risk of Hypertension

The study, of 18- to 44-year-olds in the United States, found that high blood pressure was prevalent across all racial groups: Among both white and Mexican American participants, 22% had the condition.
web md - 6 days ago
Wondering about goosebumps? Of course you are - harvard

Wondering about goosebumps? Of course you are

What are goosebumps? Why do we get them? Do they serve a purpose? Some of these questions can be answered, others can’t. But a recent study in mice links goosebumps to stem cells responsible for the regeneration of hair. The post Wondering about goosebumps? Of course you are appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 6 days ago
Another Effect of COVID: Lasting Hearing Problems?  - web md

Another Effect of COVID: Lasting Hearing Problems?

When the patients were asked if they had any changes in their hearing, 13% said it was worse. Eight patients said their hearing had deteriorated and eight said they had tinnitus (ringing in the ears).
web md - 1 week ago
Study Reveals How Coronavirus Travels Indoors  - web md

Study Reveals How Coronavirus Travels Indoors

For the study, they created a model of how these aerosols travel in indoor spaces such rooms, elevators and supermarkets. They also compared how the virus did in various types of ventilation and with different spacing of people within a room.
web md - 1 week ago
Pandemic Could Complicate Hurricane Season  - web md

Pandemic Could Complicate Hurricane Season

The average hurricane season has about 12 named storms, but up to 20 storms are being predicted this season, according to Marshall Shepherd, director of the Atmospheric Sciences Program at the University of Georgia.
web md - 1 week ago
New Study Shows Kids Are COVID Spreaders, Too  - web md

New Study Shows Kids Are COVID Spreaders, Too

Coronavirus testing performed in Chicago in March and April shows that children and teens tend to have as much virus in their nasal passages as adults, according to a research letter published online July 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.
web md - 1 week ago
One Disease Mosquitoes Don

One Disease Mosquitoes Don't Spread: Coronavirus

The researchers found that the new coronavirus can't replicate in three common species of mosquitoes -- Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus -- and therefore cannot be transmitted to humans.
web md - 1 week ago
Common Diabetes Meds Tied to Complication Risk  - web md

Common Diabetes Meds Tied to Complication Risk

People taking a class of diabetes medications called SGLT2s have up to three times the risk for a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) compared to people taking another drug, new research reveals.
web md - 1 week ago
Yet Another Study Finds Vaccines Are Safe  - web md

Yet Another Study Finds Vaccines Are Safe

Vaccine hesitancy among Americans has been highlighted as a potential problem in the nation's response to the COVID-19 pandemic, with some experts concerned that too many folks simply won't get a coronavirus vaccine even if one proves safe and effective.
web md - 1 week ago
Concussion Ups Odds for Many Brain Conditions  - web md

Concussion Ups Odds for Many Brain Conditions

The study of more than 186,000 Canadians found that those who suffered a concussion were more likely to develop any of several conditions, including: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); depression or anxiety; Parkinson's disease; or dementia.
web md - 1 week ago
Survivors

Survivors' COVID Antibodies May Be a Powerful Gift

These antibodies are among the most potent against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and could be produced by drug companies in large quantities, according to a team from Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
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WebMD Poll: Most Would Wait on COVID Vaccine  - web md

WebMD Poll: Most Would Wait on COVID Vaccine

Fewer than half of people plan to get a coronavirus vaccine in the first year it’s available, and an even smaller group -- fewer than a third -- say they’ll get it in the first 90 days, a new WebMD reader poll finds.
web md - 1 week ago
In Rush to Publish, Some COVID Studies Not Reliable  - web md

In Rush to Publish, Some COVID Studies Not Reliable

Only 75 out of 664 clinical trials for COVID-19 -- about 11% -- have all the hallmarks of a scientific study that could be expected to produce solid results, according to the study published online July 27 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
web md - 1 week ago
Doctors Worry About COVID

Doctors Worry About COVID's Effects on Hispanics

While race and ethnicity data about the coronavirus isn’t complete, the reported numbers so far suggest Hispanic American adults of any race are disproportionately represented in certain coronavirus measures:
web md - 1 week ago
Will COVID Vaccine Trials Reflect U.S. Diversity?  - web md

Will COVID Vaccine Trials Reflect U.S. Diversity?

Although racial minorities, older people and those with underlying medical conditions are most at risk from COVID-19, they’ve historically been the least likely to be included in clinical trials for treatments for serious diseases. Will that change with COVID-19?
web md - 1 week ago
Another COVID Mystery: Why Some Fall Ill  Twice  - web md

Another COVID Mystery: Why Some Fall Ill Twice

Experts are puzzling over cases where people have had COVID-19 twice. There’s been no comprehensive study of cases like this, and no one knows yet whether reinfection is possible, especially so soon after someone has recovered.
web md - 2 weeks ago
Does air pollution cause Alzheimer’s disease? - harvard

Does air pollution cause Alzheimer’s disease?

It has been known for some time that air pollution causes heart and lung diseases. Now, results from three different studies on populations in different parts of the world show an association between higher levels of air pollution and greater risk of cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. The post Does air pollution cause Alzheimer’s disease? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
harvard - 2 weeks ago
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4 parenting tips to break the negativity loop

4 parenting tips to break the negativity loop

harvard - 1 month ago

Its a beautiful day outside, you say, smiling. Your son replies, Its supposed to rain later. You share, That game was fun! Your daughter adds, I messed up one of my turns.

If you find that your child tends to channel Eeyore from Winnie-the-Pooh and has difficulty seeing some of the bright moments in a day, below are some ways to help them interrupt a negativity loop. The first tip works well for all ages. Choose the other tools depending on whether your children are younger or older.

Start by validating emotions

Parents have a lot of wisdom to share with their children, and their advice often is filled with a lot of logic. Unfortunately, that logic tends to backfire when shared with someone experiencing an unhappy emotion, and can make the emotion even stronger. Both children and adults need to feel heard before their ears can open up and hear what else you have to say, so try to validate first before you try to help children appreciate positive aspects of a situation.

Validation allows us all to feel heard. You are not agreeing or disagreeing with the emotion; youre showing that you see it. For example, if your daughter comes home sulking after scoring two goals in soccer and missing the final one, you might have the urge to say, Why are you so sad? You scored two goals and looked like you were having so much fun while playing! Your intention is kind, yet does not match your daughters experience. Instead, try reflecting how she is feeling by saying, Youre disappointed that you didnt make that final shot. This acknowledges that your daughter is disappointed without agreeing or disagreeing with her.

Sometimes, its enough to leave it at that. When you think its important to have your daughter see another side of a situation, remember to use the conjunction and instead of but so you dont negate or erase your validation. In this example, you could say, Youre disappointed that you didnt make that final shot, and I am really proud of you for trying your best for the whole game.

Alternatively, you could add a question to help your daughter discover positive aspects of the experience herself. In this case, you could say, Youre disappointed that you didnt make that final shot, and I wonder if there were any parts of the game that you enjoyed?

A few more tips:

  • Say, Youre [insert emotion here] because Some examples of emotion words include sad, angry, worried, disappointed, embarrassed, disgusted, jealous, guilty, and surprised. Try to be as specific as possible. For example, Upset, could be a mixture of emotions, so identify which ones, such as sadness and/or anger, might be at play.
  • Try to avoid, I understand that youre feeling or I know that youre feeling… As children get older, it will be developmentally on target for them to think that you could not possibly know what their experiences are like, and make you feel like youve entered a land mine by trying to relate to them.
  • Instead, offer a validation tentatively, You seem or I wonder if you were

Reflect on positive events

  • Younger children (under 8) may enjoy the High-Low Game, which helps them balance out negative experience reflections with positive ones. You can use the start of dinner time each night to have each family member share one high or positive experience in the day and one low or negative experience in the day. You even can have your son start off by sharing the low before the high, so that he ends on a high note. This is a way to hear about everyones day and see how your son views his daily experiences.
  • Older children (8 and up) may prefer a positive events diary. If your son walks around in life as though wearing those sunglasses from the 80s that look like window blinds and only seem to let in the negative events of each day, try having him write down three positive experiences he had at the end of each day. Not only can this help him realize that his day was not all bad, it also can help him improve his mood.

Foster gratitude

  • Younger children (under 8) may like playing this game during dinner. Have everyone practice identifying something for which theyre grateful that day. Practicing gratitude in this way can create a more positive tone at meals, and maybe just maybe you might even hear that your son is grateful for the meal you just prepared!
  • Older children (8 and up) could try a daily gratitude log, and you can set the tone for doing this by writing in your journal each day, too. It can be a slippery slope once someone starts focusing on all the things going wrong that day. Fostering gratitude, an appreciation of experiences, people, or things that are at least partially outside of oneself or ones own doing, can help your daughter form a different and more positive relationship with aspects of her day, and research has shown that gratitude can help improve ones mood. Have your daughter take a step back and remind herself of a few things for which shes grateful each day. She can use prompts, such as Someone/Something I was grateful for today was to get her started.

The takeaways

When you are concerned that your child reacts more like Eeyore than like Tigger, remember that your child needs to feel heard before he can see another perspective. Validate first, and then you can help your child consider all aspects, both positive and negative ones.

If you find that your child remains stuck in a negativity loop and starts to show signs of depression, ask your childs pediatrician for a referral for therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, so that just like Eeyore, your child can learn tools to look for sunshine.

The post 4 parenting tips to break the negativity loop appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.

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